A Day at Camp

Sample Schedule

7:45 - Kima (wake up)

8:15 - Mifkad (morning meeting)

8:30 - Avoda (morning chores)

9:00 - Breakfast

9:45 - Zman Kvutza (group activity)

11:15 - Zman Machane (unit activity)

12:30 - Schiya (a quick dip)

1:00 - Lunch

2:00 - Zman Mosh (campwide event)

3:30 - Chugim (electives)

5:00 - Zman Kvutza

6:30 - Shira

7:00 - Dinner

8:30 - Erev Tarbut (cultural event)

Terminology

Can't understand the Hebrew words your child is saying? We're here to help!

Mosh is the nickname we give our Moshava, and Zman Mosh is time that is spent with all of camp. This is also a great period for chanichim to interact with campers of other age levels, act as role models for younger kids, and be inspired by older leaders. During this period, we include much of the camp-wide traditions, such as Capture the Flag and Color Wars.

Kvutza (age group)

Each Kvutza goes through an educational process together during the summer, the main themes differing by age. They spend the most amount of time together during the day, and are led by the same Madrichimot throughout the summer. The cabins are organized by Kvutza too.

Zman Kvutza

Twice a day, each Kvutza has its own activities organized by their counselors. Activities differ by day, and can range from going on a nature walk to learning about economics. This is the group that chanichim will get to know the best over their time at camp, sharing bunks with them, and often becoming lifelong friends!

Zman Mosh

Mosh is the nickname we give our Moshava, and Zman Mosh is time that is spent with all of camp. This is also a great period for chanichim to interact with campers of other age levels, act as role models for younger kids, and be inspired by older leaders. During this period, we include much of the camp-wide traditions, such as Capture the Flag and Color Wars.

Mifkad 

We start off every day with a morning gathering, in which we introduce exciting events of that day, give daily reminders, and do morning stretches together. On Saturday there is an official mifkad where we wear our movement shirts and reflect on the week.

Avoda

After Mifkad, the entire camp is split for chore time. Each kvutza is given different responsibilities to help keep our Moshava (camp) running and clean. One day it may be collecting eggs from the farm, and the next could be cleaning their cabin. The goal of this work is to create a sense of responsibility and ownership of the camp and its surroundings among campers.

Kabbalat Shabbat

A ceremony designed to welcome the Shabbat before our Friday dinner. The ceremony rests on Jewish tradition found on the Sabbath, but our ceremony is in line with Secular Humanistic Judaism. There is usually a rotation of who gets to dedicate a blessing to the candles, challah, and wine and the blessings themselves are given meaning dependent on whoever is in charge of the ceremony during that week.

Havdalah

Every Saturday evening, after the different kvutzot cook their meals on an open fire, we come together around an even bigger fire. At this time, anyone who wishes is given the opportunity to artistically express themselves without fear or judgement. This takes the form of songs, poetry, joke telling, etc. Havdalah is one of the activities that chanichim and Hadracha (staff) look forward to the most.

Tiyul

Everyone gets to go on a hike at some point during the summer. These trips are usually overnight camping trips, so we recommend bringing a sleeping bag to camp. The upper two kvutzot have special trips, including canoeing down the Delaware and climbing Slide Mountain. All hiking trips end with ice cream on the way back to camp.